Personal Electronics

Description:

Holo Generator ($500/cubic foot of projection): projects a holographic picture from a replaceable chip. Generator is compatible with chips from most digital cameras.

Video Board ($50/square foot): monitor using flat-LCD technology. No thicker than an inch, most video boards are used as TVs, although they can be used as billboards. 3D (Trideo) appears to be 3D even without special glasses and costs twice as much ($100 per square foot)

Smartphone ($400): Like current day smartphones the small cellular phone replaces nearly all personal electronics. It is considered a computer for most purposes, but is not powerful enough to use as a cyberdeck.

Video Camera ($800): All smartphones can be used as cameras, so this is for a professional grade camera used by news crews and movie makers. For double the cost it can record in trideo ($1,600) making the images look 3D, triple the cost for a holo-recorder (makes a holographic recording from the camera’s perspective, it takes multiple camera angles for a full hologram).

Datachip ($1): A data chip can be used to store data, they hold 1 terabyte and are the size of a dime. A datachip with information on it will vary in price by what it contains; a popular music recording might be $10-$20, Movies run $5-$20 in 2D, $10-$30 in trideo, or $20-$50 in full holo. Braindance chips generally run $50-$100 for standard, $100-$500 for Full-X, and $250-$1,000 for exotic BTLs (BTLs may drop to $5-$25 if they have a reputation for bad side effects). Skillsofts generally run $100-$1,050 for most skills.

Musical Instrument ($100-$1,000): Musical instruments may be cyberlinked-synth machines more like a cyberdeck than a traditional guitar or a fully accoustic version with no electronics at all. More expensive versions tend to be from big names while the lower price models are generic.

Cyberlinks: Many systems are made to be linked cybernetically to their operators. The best way to do this is with low impedence cables (add 1 to normal effect), but there are induction links (no bonus or penalty), Wireless links (subtract 1 from normal effect), and even Trode connections for those without cyberware (subtract 2 from cyber-effect, normally enough to cancel the bonus).

  • Low Impedence Cables: $100 per set
  • Induction Link: $100 per item modified
  • Wireless link: $100 per item modified, but can be activated at up to 30 ft.
  • Trode Link: $50 (Plugs into cable socket)

Cyberdeck ($1,000): A hacking computer it operates much faster than a smart-phone and can do all the same functions. Typically the size of a net-book or small laptop computer. It is normally controlled by Cyberlinks rather than using a keyboard (-5 initiative if using keyboard controls). A cyberdeck can be used to overcome computers and other electronic security by tapping into the systems either with a direct wire connection or through the computer’s wireless signal.

Mastoid Commo ($100): The typical ear canal radio for low profile operations Can be linked to a smartphone or used independently with a 10 mile range.

Housekeeping Robot ($1,000): a simple robot with no real skills, it can vacuum, mop, and dust, but isn’t equipped to deal with tossed furniture or other serious messes.

Cardlock Decryptor ($500): the probe of this device is inserted into the slot of a cardlock and attempts to decieve the lock into opening. Use of this device instead of just a normal set of tools gives a 5 point bonus to defeating cardlocks.

VocDecryptor ($1,000): a vocal modulator for penetrating vocolocks. Use of this device instead of just a normal set of tools gives a 5 point bonus to defeating vocolocks.

Security Scanner ($1,500): this device searches out electromagnetic fields generated by various alarm systems (75% chance of location). A TECH or INT roll may be needed to identify the style of alarm encountered.

Poison Sniffer ($1,500): can be set to check air or liquid for a specific poison(s). Otherwise, it will simply alert you to foreign substances. 85% accuracy.

Jamming Transmitter ($500): usually comes in 2 or 3 large cases, but can fill an entire van. Jams electromagetic transmissions in a 1,000 foot area (that includes cellular phones and some cyberware).

Scanner Plate ($500): a reading device for palmprint locks. Can be attached to any type of Card or Voclock to add an extra layer of security. Fooling a palm scanner is always very difficult (25) unless a recognized palm is available.

Retina Scanner ($1,000): a reading device for scanning the retina at the back of the eye. Without a reprogramable retina or the eye of a recognized user it is nearly impossible (30) to bypass.

Movement Sensor ($40): a typical alarm system. Covers seismic, sonar, and fixed IR or visible light networks. Detects movement in a defined area, with a 95% reliability. The sensory processor is about the size of a pack of cigarettes.

Passcard ($10) the most common unlocking device for a cardlock, passcards only work for the locks programmed to work with them.

Tracking Device ($1,000): hand held tracer for detecting/following tracer buttons. Range is 10 miles in the wilderness (no range limit in cities as the signal will use the cellular network).

Tracer Buttons ($50/box): can be any size from a matchbook to a pin. Uses radioactivity or constant/pulsed radio transmission to pinpoint who or what it’s attached to. Some can be turned on/off remotely. Come in a box of 6.

Manual Locks: Manual Locks may use a key or tumbler code. They can’t be activated electronically and must be manually picked/solved/cut.
Standard ($20) Moderate (15) to bypass.
Improved ($40) Difficult (20) to bypass
High Security ($80) Very Difficult (25) to bypass
Maximum Security ($160) Nearly Impossible (30) to bypass

Keypad and Cardlocks: use a typed code or an electronic swipe key to access. Many corporations use implanted chips with sensors in their employees that not only act as the locks, but also track when a where employees were moving.
Standard ($100) Moderate (15) to bypass.
Improved ($200) Difficult (20) to bypass
High Security ($400) Very Difficult (25) to bypass
Maximum Security ($800) Nearly Impossible (30) to bypass

Vocolocks use voice recognition and a passphrase to secure a locked area. Vocolocks were very popular for a while and are still standard on many robots and power armor.
Standard ($200) Moderate (15) to bypass.
Improved ($400) Difficult (20) to bypass
High Security ($800) Very Difficult (25) to bypass
Maximum Security ($1,600) Nearly Impossible (30) to bypass

Bio:

Personal Electronics

Cyber-Rifts Fortebrocci